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McGirt v. Oklahoma Supreme Court Oral Arguments

McGirt v. Oklahoma Supreme Court Oral Arguments

In case you missed it, please enjoy this recorded webinar:

McGirt v. Oklahoma Supreme Court Oral Arguments: An analysis of the History, Law, and Arguments of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Reservation Case

The United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments on May 11, 2020, in McGirt v Oklahoma, case #18-9526 (by telephone) involving the status of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation reservation. Last year, the Court heard arguments on a nearly identical case in the Murphy matter. This decision could have an enormous impact for Indian law, positive or negative. Come join us for a FREE webinar to hear tribal perspective as to the surrounding Muscogee cultural history, the jurisprudence of Indian lands in Oklahoma and thoughts and analysis of the oral arguments from the Muscogee Nation’s Supreme Court amicus brief advocate Riyaz Kanji.

Moderators: Nikki Borchardt Campbell, NAICJA Executive Director Hon. Gregory Bigler (Euchee), District Judge, Muscogee (Creek) Nation District Court, NAICJA BOD

Faculty Presenters: Hon. Gregory Bigler (Euchee), District Judge, Muscogee (Creek) Nation District Court, NAICJA BOD Stacy Leeds (Cherokee), Vice-Chancellor University of Arkansas, former Dean of University of Arkansas Law School Riyaz Kanji, Partner, Kanji and Katzen

FEBRUARY 21, 2020: THREE TAILS ON ONE RABBITc

FEBRUARY 21, 2020: THREE TAILS ON ONE RABBIT: PRESERVING JUSTICE THROUGH TRADITIONAL, INTERNATIONAL AND FEDERAL SYSTEMS, THE UN DECLARATION ON THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES.

Tribal court judges, often unknowingly, fill multiple needs within tribal systems. First, they adjudicate disputes. Second, they are the focal point of attacks, or preservation of, sovereignty of tribes. The federal system often in an off-hand manner assaults our tribal adjudicatory processes as illustrated in U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments and decisions. Third, we can function as a tribal mechanism for institutionalizing our culture, social structures and traditional processes, carrying our tribal systems into the future. We will give examples of each of these threads through stories, documents, laws and history.

FACULTY:

HON. GREGORY BIGLER, MUSCOGEE (CREEK) NATION DISTRICT COURT; APPELLATE JUDGE MASHANTUCKET PEQUOT NATION; SUPREME COURT JUDGE OF IOWA TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA; CHIEF JUSTICE SUPREME COURT KICKAPOO TRIBE IN KANSAS; SUPREME COURT JUSTICE QUAPAW TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA.

PROFESSOR KRISTEN CARPENTER, COUNCIL TREE PROFESSOR OF LAW AND DIRECTOR OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN LAW PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO LAW SCHOOL. PROFESSOR CARPENTER ALSO SERVES ON THE UNITED NATIONS EXPERT MECHANISM ON THE RIGHTS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AS ITS MEMBER FROM NORTH AMERICA.

MODERATORS:

REBEKAH HORSECHIEF (OSAGE), PROGRAM COORDINATOR, NATIONAL AMERICAN INDIAN COURT JUDGES ASSOCIATION

ANSLEY SHERMAN MUSCOGEE (CREEK), PROGRAM ATTORNEY, NATIONAL AMERICAN INDIAN COURT JUDGES ASSOCIATION.

JULY 19, 2019: ADDRESSING SECONDARY TRAUMA IN TRIBAL COURT STAFF

JULY 19, 2019: ADDRESSING SECONDARY TRAUMA IN TRIBAL COURT STAFF

Secondary Trauma results in professionals who work with those who have experienced trauma. Tribal court and tribal social service professionals  spend their days working with and providing support to clients who have experienced trauma. This secondary trauma can result in burnout among staff. It is important for Tribal Court staff to engage in practices to address their secondary trauma in order to effectively serve the children and families in their courts. This session will explore secondary trauma and provide participants with practical culturally specific tools to help them deal with the secondary trauma.

FACULTY:

HON. CHERYL DEMMERT FAIRBANKS (TLINGIT/TSIMSHIAN), JUSTICE, INTER-TRIBAL COURT OF APPEALS OF NEVADA

MODERATOR:

REBEKAH HORSECHIEF (OSAGE), PROGRAM COORDINATOR, NATIONAL AMERICAN INDIAN COURT JUDGES ASSOCIATION

JUNE 25, 2019: ROLE OF THE TRIBAL COURT JUDGE

JUNE 25, 2019: ROLE OF THE TRIBAL COURT JUDGE

The role of the Tribal court judge can vary from tribe to tribe and state to state. The judge must navigate intersections and gaps in state, federal and tribal authority in Indian Country The faculty for this session will be several tribal court judges who will talk about the challenges and opportunities this unique bench provides.

FACULTY:

Hon. John Traylor, Presiding Judge for Gila River Indian Community Court of Appeals

MODERATOR:

Rebekah HorseChief (Osage), Program Coordinator, National American Indian Court Judges Association

APRIL 25, 2019: DATA SOVEREIGNTY: STORYTELLING THROUGH NUMBERS AND EVALUATIONS

APRIL 25, 2019: DATA SOVEREIGNTY: STORYTELLING THROUGH NUMBERS AND EVALUATIONS

Tribal courts are often called upon to navigate a relationship with state courts, state welfare agencies and law enforcement. This can be challenging as many state court and agency professionals do not understand tribal law or sovereignty. This webinar will explore how Tribal courts can develop working relationships with state courts, agencies, and law enforcement to ensure better outcomes for tribal members.

FACULTY:

Melissa Sickmund, Director, The National Center for Juvenile Justice

Kate Trujillo (Laguna), Program Coordinator, National American Indian Court Judges Association

MODERATOR:

Rebekah HorseChief (Osage), Program Coordinator, National American Indian Court Judges Association

MARCH 29, 2019: WORKING WITH LGBTQ2S IN TRIBAL COURTS

MARCH 29, 2019: WORKING WITH LGBTQ2S IN TRIBAL COURTS

This session explores how tribal courts can work effectively and respectfully with members of the LGBTQ2S community. The webinar provides a basic overview of terminology and will discuss some of the challenges that the LGBTQ2S community faces. The webinar also provides some practical tips that courts can use when working with the LGBTQ2S community.

FACULTY:
Kurt Begaye (Dine), Director of Training and Technical Assistance, Southwest Indigenous Women’s Coalition, Begaye Consulting

MODERATOR:
Rebekah HorseChief (Osage), Program Coordinator, National American Indian Court Judges Association

MARCH 11, 2019: REENTRY PRIMER FOR TRIBAL COURTS

MARCH 11, 2019: REENTRY PRIMER FOR TRIBAL COURTS

One individual’s incarceration impacts the entire community, as every person’s role is important for the community’s livelihood. Reentry is a process assisted by programs to help formerly incarcerated individuals prepare to be active, contributing members of the community. These programs address the needs of offenders by reconnecting tribal members with the community and offering career readiness programs, vocational training, and designated housing upon release.

FACULTY:
Keith Green, Operation Coordinator, Muscogee (Creek) Nation, Reentry Program

MODERATOR:
Rebekah HorseChief (Osage), Program Coordinator, National American Indian Court Judges Association

FEBRUARY 27, 2019: PEACEMAKING PART II

FEBRUARY 27, 2019: PEACEMAKING PART II

This session is a follow-up to the very successful Peacemaking webinar conducted in 2017. This webinar discusses how tribal traditions may hold a solution to some problems that have proven especially difficult in tribal court, provides some examples of how other tribes have had success, and explains how this movement is part of a bigger picture, even internationally, of how indigenous communities are using their own wisdom to solve their problems. Peacemaking is not alternative dispute resolution to Native communities – it is the original, traditional way our communities managed to work through disputes for centuries before tribal courts were created. Because of natural limitations inherent in tribal courts, there is increasing interest in the continuation and revitalization of those traditional ways.

FACULTY:
Professor Shawn Watts (Cherokee) Clinical Associate Professor and Director of the University of Kansas, School of Law Mediation Clinic

MODERATOR:
Rebekah HorseChief (Osage), Program Coordinator, National American Indian Court Judges Association

DECEMBER 19, 2018 – BUILDING TRIBAL COURT CAPACITY

DECEMBER 19, 2018 – BUILDING TRIBAL COURT CAPACITY

This session will explores how tribal courts can build and enhance their capacity to serve their community. Faculty discusses the basics of court management and how to develop programs to support the legal work of the Court. Faculty also addresses how the development of Court programs can allow for involvement of the community and Tribal Membership in the Tribal Court and enhances relationship building between the Court and the Community and Membership it serves.

FACULTY:
Angela Fasana, Court Administrator, Conf. Tribes of Grand Ronde
Adrea Korthase, Site Manager, NCJFCJ

MODERATOR:
Rebekah HorseChief, NAICJA Program Coordinator

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